Fastest way to heal heel blisters?

Discussion in 'General Dance Discussion' started by wooh, Oct 2, 2006.

  1. wooh

    wooh Well-Known Member

    So I kept dancing in the new shoes, even though no matter what, couldn't keep the bandaid covering the new blisters that were forming. (Didn't have my always works giant fabric bandaids on me at the time.) So now have GIANT blisters on the back of both heels, and the one is really bad, as in small little touch and it bleeds. So anyone have any tips for helping them heal faster (other than the let them rest which unfortunately can't do for a couple weeks!)
     
  2. Shooshoo

    Shooshoo New Member

    When you have your shoes on, wear giant fabric bandaids. Otherwise, try to let them dry. It takes a while.
     
  3. MacMoto

    MacMoto Active Member

    Blister plasters are very good -- the gel pad on them helps blisters heal more quickly, and also cusions the area much better than normal plasters. They kept me dancing when my new shoes gave me blisters on my heels.
     
  4. SPratt74

    SPratt74 New Member

    There are new band aides that stretch all away around your foot. I'm not sure what they are called now. I haven't had to buy any since I broke in my new shoes. But I know what you are going through. I can think of the pain now in fact lol.
     
  5. atk

    atk Active Member

    I recently got a nasty blister on the inside of my foot, where there was a hard piece of leather in the shoe. I tried band aids, moleskin, and gauze, but none of them really worked - I needed to keep the pressure entirely off the sensitive spot.

    So, heres what I did:


    First, I covered the area with gauze/bandaid/whatever, to keep it clean. My blister opened, so I also put bacitracin on it.

    Next, I wanted to prevent further rubbing - since slight padding wouldn't do it for me, I needed to lift the shoe off my foot. I took a piece of pre-cut 1" square gauze (you can buy a box of 25 at CVS), and unfolded it once, so that it was 1" x 2". Then I rolled it up, and placed it in a circle around the blister.

    Code:
      ===
    // X \\    X's indicate where the blister was
    ||XXX||   =, //, \\ is meant to indicate rolled gauze
    \\ X //
      ===
    



    I held it down with 1st aid tape - 1 cm or so, where the gauze would bend, to make it easy surround the blister. Then, again, in a plus sign over the whole thing, to make sure it stayed put.

    Finally, I didn't want the whole thing to be pulled off by my sock when I put it on, or by the rubbing of the shoe, in case it caught under the edge of the gauze, so I covered it in a piece of moleskin.


    There's probably a better way (the Gel pads that MacMoto mentions probably would have done the same job) but I didn't see anything at the store when I looked :)
     
  6. Laura

    Laura New Member

    Band-Aid and NexCare make these special patches for blisters. They are padded with gel, and form a watertight seal against your skin so they don't come off. You put them on, and leave them on for up to three days (or maybe it was up to five, read the label). If the blister isn't gone, you just change the bandage and go for another few days. There is some medicine in the patch that helps you heal and not get infected. Also, and this is the weird part, it's like the blister fluid gets sucked up by the gel bandage, so the bandage gets puffier over time as the blister goes down underneath the gel.

    I had the world's worst blisters at USA Dance Nationals. I still have scars on my feet from them. These gel blister patches saved me!
     
  7. Shooshoo

    Shooshoo New Member

    So they really work? I also get horrible blisters (but from hiking). Haven't tried these gel blister patches.
     
  8. MacMoto

    MacMoto Active Member

    Yes :cool:
     
  9. wooh

    wooh Well-Known Member

    Thanks for the advice. Unfortunately, the one heel is I think way past the point of leaving a blister bandaid on it. I've figured out a padding system between non-stick gauze and bandaids that seems to be working. I soooo should have stopped dancing when it was getting bad, but I'm just way too stubborn!!
     
  10. delamusica

    delamusica Active Member

    Well, apparently I'm in the minority here, but I'll chime in anyway.

    I get huge nasty blisters when I'm breaking in dance shoes or wearing dance shoes that are too old and stretched (and somehow it always feels like one or the other!).

    When I get a big blister, I always drain it and then cut off the dead skin with a small pair of clean scissors. Then I keep it covered with neosporin and a bandaid for a couple of days to keep it from getting infected, and then I just leave it alone after that. They almost always heal really quickly.

    I tried all those blister-healing bandage things, but I've never been able to get anything to stick to my feet and ankles.
     
  11. Laura

    Laura New Member

    Your method sounds just like what the blister bandaids do -- obviously the key is an adhesive that sticks to you really well. So, I think the neosporin/bandaid route is a really good thing to try.
     
  12. skwiggy

    skwiggy Well-Known Member

    The trick with the heel is that with all the bending, I've had a heck of a time finding ANYTHING that would stick while I danced. And I tried every blister pad on the market.

    The thing I had the most luck with was a special type of band aid that had adhesive made with duct tape. I can't remember what they were called, but I found them at the drug store. They usually lasted through about 1 hour of practice, whereas I couldn't find anything else that lasted more than 10 minutes.
     
  13. Al Gisnered

    Al Gisnered Member


    An avid hiker once told me to wear two pair of socks when breaking in a new pair of boots. One thin, sleazy nyon next to the skin, the other whatever regular sock I would wear. The theory is that blisters are caused by leather/fabric rubbing on skin. With the double layer the sleazy nylon sticks to the skin and the other fabric rubs nylon, not skin. It seems to work, and I always wear two pair of socks when breaking in new shoes that are "iffy".

    I told this to one of my former partners who, trying out new shoes, developed a truly honker heel blister on one foot and the beginnings of one on the other. She band-aided the blister and wore a pair of thigh-highs and a pair of pantyhose over top. We never missed a minute of practice.

    That was in the winter. Summer came and she gave up on hosiery - too hot, you know. Of course, she grew another blister. I allowed as how I had no sympathy for her, since I was wearing wool socks. :p
     
  14. anntennis

    anntennis Active Member

    Very hot water as much as you can bear. It should " break ". Than put a wide band aid the next day
     

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